You’ve heard people talk about illness that’s “all in your mind.” They may not be completely wrong.

You’ve heard people talk about illness that’s “all in your mind.” They may not be completely wrong.

And these same feelings and memories create challenges in our psychological state. These challenges can develop at the time of trauma or much later in life after the adverse event. In Freud’s model the subconscious and unconscious levels are similar, but the unconscious level is seen as the deepest level, and includes deep-seated emotions and trauma, whereas the subconscious holds thoughts, behavior patterns and emotional information that is more readily accessible. The subconscious is seen as more of a gateway between the conscious and unconscious levels. “For our purposes,” Lipinski says, “we focus on the subconscious or unconscious information that is driving current responses in the background like a computer drive.” With hypnotherapy, she points out, the process begins by looking at the present emotion which would usually be among the core emotions: fear, anger, sadness, guilt or shame. And anxiety, Lipinski says, exists on that fear spectrum.  /**/ if ( CCHealth.isMobile() ) { googletag.ccHealth.push({id: ‘billboard2_300x250_mobile’, lazyLoad: false}); } /**/ Advertising Policy Even if it’s a free-floating anxiety, a term currently being used to explain the feeling of anxiety that a client has without a connection to a particular stressor, Lipinski says the next step is to explore if that anxiety is also linked to an incident in the past. “Does it go back to something from earlier in life? What did the patient conclude or decide after experiencing it? How is that conclusion being acted upon today in their current circumstances subconsciously or unconsciously?” “It’s not that the anxieties that are happening today aren’t real. They are,” she says. “But the response to it might go back to third grade, where we made a decision or a conclusion about ourselves with the thinking of a third-grader, with a more concrete mind and in many cases, the third grader did not have emotional support from an adult or did not know how to access that support.

And sometimes that third grade conclusion is what gets subconsciously pulled forward, causing us to operate from that historical place.” Lipinski says, hypnotherapy starts with guided imagery to help the patient enter a more relaxed state. But, she adds, this is an interactive process and the client maintains awareness during the session and memory of the session following it.   Once in a relaxed state, the patient is guided to begin connecting the current stressors with feelings from the past. “It’s a process that allows patients to gain different insights about what’s fueling their behavior,” Lipinski says. “And that can help them to process the suppressed or older emotions and change the negative subconscious or unconscious thoughts that they’re having about themselves or their life circumstances.  Focus on mindfulness With this in mind, Lipinski says, “A lot of our therapeutic work tends to be in the place of mindfulness, looking at the content and language of our thoughts.reduslim funziona We have control over how we think, just as we have control over how we speak. We can take negative thoughts that we are having and change the words of those thoughts to something healthier. And then our emotional experience follows the thoughts, allowing us to experience more balanced emotions.”  She says that her role for the most part, isn’t to send the patient back to a specific time in their life, although this can be a part of hypnotherapy, Rather, it’s to guide the patient back to a time when they previously felt similar emotions as they are feeling in the present. “You have memories about events from certain ages in your life. Hypnotherapy helps people to connect the feelings and experiences of our child selves to our more complex understanding that is available with our adult minds. This, in turn, can help to resolve feelings of powerlessness from childhood and allow people to make healthier decisions in the future,” Lipinksi says. The process, she says, honors where each client has been in life and how their own resilience can help them with what’s happening in the present. /**/ if ( CCHealth.isMobile() ) { googletag.ccHealth.push({id: ‘billboard3_300x250_mobile’, lazyLoad: false}); } /**/ Advertising Policy The stigma of “hypno” Lipinski stresses the differentiation between hypnosis and hypnotherapy. “Hypnosis is a method characterized by providing relief from symptoms through a relaxed state and post-hypnotic suggestion,” she says. “Hypnotherapy is an interactive therapeutic process using hypnosis and techniques from other therapy models, such as cognitive therapies, somatic theory, mindfulness and inner child/wise adult work.” Hypnotherapy is provided by a licensed therapist with specialized certifications and is focused on the client and therapist discovering the root cause of anxiety and other emotional challenges. In society, there is often a pop-culture view of using hypnotic suggestions for comedy purposes or mind control purposes.

This is the definitive opposite of how hypnosis is used in the hypnotherapy setting. “Before a patient begins the process,” according to Lipinski, “a full mental health evaluation is completed and treatment goals are set with the client.” Clients benefit from hypnotherapy by exploring what roles that they have taken on in life, (beginning in their family of origin), and this type of therapy empowers them to gain self-awareness and healthy boundaries with others and themselves. In doing so, they report feeling less anxious and more connected to their own goals and purpose. It’s a supportive, effective and safe method. Emotional safety tools are built into the model, including the patient’s option to stop the process at any time. The advantages of hypnotherapy While there are a number of therapy styles available to patients, Lipinski says that a few factors in favor of hypnotherapy are the client’s reports of its effectiveness. “Hypnotherapy can target the emotional blocks or natural resistance that we have in our subconscious/unconscious minds. Connecting with our true healthy power and learning new skills to manage and let go of emotions, is a strong weapon against anxiety.” “The bigger gain for clients is that they are walking around feeling different about themselves,” she continues. “There’s an integration that happens with this model where the client is responding to things from a more confident, calm place. There is behavioral change, but more importantly, there is a self-esteem change.

This calmness carries over into their family life, their work life and their passions or interests.” “The process can be very empowering,” she says. “And it’s especially helpful in reducing anxiety.” ” “https://health.clevelandclinic.org/tag/blood-pumping/200OK This medical condition, although rare, occurs in about five of every 10,000 births and affects boys and girls equally. Congenital heart defects are the most common type of birth defect in the United States, affecting nearly one in 100 births every year. Most heart defects are caught during pregnancy, but some are not. Know what symptoms to look for. ” “https://health.clevelandclinic.org/tag/nutrients/200OK Avocados are jam-packed with nutrients and vitamins and can make a delicious, nutritious addition to your diet. For most of us, the smell of our favorite meal cooking on the stove might inspire a little taste test. But for some people, taking any kind of forkful isn’t an option. Approximately 40,000 people in the U.S. rely solely on intravenous fluids (IV) to meet their caloric and nutritional needs. This therapy is known … Read More ” “https://health.clevelandclinic.org/do-you-want-to-lose-weight-learn-to-relax/200OK Do You Want to Lose Weight? Learn to Relax If you want to lose weight, here’s why you need to relax.

Our expert explains how the two are related. One way to fight excess weight may surprise you. Besides clocking in time with a tread mill, it turns out we also need to do the opposite: learn to relax. Experts say managing stress effectively doesn’t only help with weight loss, but it makes us healthier overall. /**/ if ( CCHealth.isMobile() ) { googletag.ccHealth.push({id: ‘billboard_300x250_mobile’, lazyLoad: false}); } /**/ Advertising Policy Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy According to Mladen Golubic, MD, PhD, Medical Director of Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Lifestyle Medicine, excess weight and high levels of stress contribute to lifestyle-related chronic disease — and the two are related. “Relieving chronic stress leads to better eating and exercising. Those lifestyle practices are proven to stop the progression of — and sometimes reverse — some chronic diseases,” Dr.

Golubic says. Is it all in my mind? You’ve heard people talk about illness that’s “all in your mind.” They may not be completely wrong. That’s not to say illnesses are imaginary. But, according to Dr. Golubic, improved mental well-being is an important ingredient for overcoming: /**/ if ( CCHealth.isMobile() ) { googletag.ccHealth.push({id: ‘billboard2_300x250_mobile’, lazyLoad: false}); } /**/ Advertising Policy Heart disease Type 2 diabetes High blood pressure Obesity Excess weight and high levels of stress contribute to lifestyle-related chronic disease — and the two are related. “Relieving chronic stress leads to better eating and exercising,” he says. “Those lifestyle practices are proven to stop the progression of — and sometimes reverse — some chronic diseases.” Why relaxation is so powerful Relaxing by practicing meditation, yoga and other mind-body techniques can make us more accepting of our emotional states, says Dr. Golubic. This acceptance leads to: Better mental control: We’re less likely to give in to habits and impulses. Truer hunger (and fullness) signals: We’re less likely to soothe stress by eating. Studies have also reported significant weight loss in people who practice meditation. “Weight loss requires a resilient mind,” says Dr. Golubic. “We need mental strength to confront the challenges of today’s sedentary lifestyles, surrounded by processed and addictive food-like substances.” How you can try it More Americans are using mind-body approaches to improve their health and well-being, according to a recent nationwide survey.

About 21 million adults (nearly double the number from 2002) and 1.7 million children practice yoga. Almost as many practice meditation. /**/ if ( CCHealth.isMobile() ) { googletag.ccHealth.push({id: ‘billboard3_300x250_mobile’, lazyLoad: false}); } /**/ Advertising Policy You can try it too, by: Watching DVDs on relaxation techniques. You can learn how to meditate, do yoga or tai chi, or use guided imagery. Attending yoga and/or meditation classes. You can learn stretching, breathing and meditation from an experienced yoga therapist or meditation practitioner. Be sure to find a class that works for you.

There are many types of yoga and meditation practice available for people of every fitness and experience level. Seeing a lifestyle medicine professional. Lifestyle medicine experts will teach you a variety of techniques for relaxation, healthy cooking and eating, and effective exercise. “The same approaches don’t work for everyone due to genetic or behavioral factors,” says Dr. Golubic. “Be bold, be persistent, and dare to experiment to find the most effective, sustainable self-care path for you.” ” “https://health.clevelandclinic.org/recipe-pumpkin-ravioli-wild-mushrooms/200OK Recipe: Pumpkin Ravioli With Wild Mushrooms Switch up how you make your ravioli. This contains a mix of mushrooms and pumpkin mousse for a great filling. Ravioli filled with this savory pumpkin mousse will delight your family and friends. A mix of wild mushrooms works well for the broth. Try thinly sliced cremini, shiitakes, chanterelles and morels. You can also use winter squashes or sweet potatoes for the filling. /**/ if ( CCHealth.isMobile() ) { googletag.ccHealth.push({id: ‘billboard_300x250_mobile’, lazyLoad: false}); } /**/ Advertising Policy Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Ingredients Ravioli1 shallot, minced¾ cup pumpkin puree¼ cup egg substitute2 tablespoons reduced-fat ricotta cheese2 teaspoons minced fresh sage1/8 teaspoon ground nutmegFreshly ground pepper32 won ton wrappers (3.5-inch square), defrosted if frozenKosher saltRefrigerated butter-flavored cooking spray Wild Mushroom-Ginger Broth3 cups fat-free, reduced-sodium chicken broth½ pound assorted wild mushrooms, thinly sliced2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger1 garlic clove, crushed2 scallions, white parts and 3 inches of the green, thinly sliced Preparation Coat a nonstick skillet with cooking spray. Saute the shallot over medium heat until wilted, about 5 minutes.

Remove from heat. In a bowl, combine the pumpkin puree, egg substitute, ricotta cheese, sage and nutmeg. Stir in the shallot and pepper. Set aside.Place 8 won tons on the counter and put 1 tablespoon of the pumpkin mousse in the middle of each. Wet the edges of the won ton and place another on top, pressing all around the edges to seal securely. Leave square or cut with a floured glass to make a circle, again making sure that each ravioli is sealed. Place on wax paper and cover with a clean kitchen towel. Place another 8 won tons on the counter and repeat the process. If not cooking immediately, transfer to a cookie sheet, cover and refrigerate.To make the broth, combine the chicken broth, rehydrated and fresh mushrooms, ginger and garlic in a saucepan, bring to a boil, then simmer for 10 minutes. Set aside and keep warm.To cook the ravioli, bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Reduce to a simmer. Slide in half of the ravioli one at a time and stir gently.

Poach for 2 to 3 minutes, until the ravioli rise to the top of the pot. Remove with a slotted spoon and cook the remainder of the ravioli.While the ravioli are cooking, bring the ginger broth back to a simmer.To serve, place 4 ravioli in each of 4 shallow soup bowls. Ladle ¾ cup broth into each soup bowl. Top with a quarter of the mushrooms and garnish with sliced scallions. Serve immediately. Nutrition information Makes 4 servings /**/ if ( CCHealth.isMobile() ) { googletag.ccHealth.push({id: ‘billboard2_300x250_mobile’, lazyLoad: false}); } /**/ Advertising Policy Per Serving:Calories: 280Total fat: 5 g (0 g saturated fat)Cholesterol: 10 mgSodium: 700 mgPotassium 657 mgTotal carbohydrates: 55 gDietary fiber: 4 gProtein: 13 g ” “https://health.clevelandclinic.org/a-hidden-cause-of-chronic-pain-why-your-brain-sometimes-wont-let-go-of-pain/200OK A Hidden Cause of Chronic Pain: Why Your Brain Sometimes Won’t Let Go of Pain Have you lived for years with spine or knee pain, headaches, arthritis pain or post-surgery pain?

Then you may benefit from treatment for centralized pain. For years, painful knee arthritis hobbled you.